Yerevan:   +24 °C
Today:   Wednesday, 20 June, 2018

Natural is best! Australian mothers breastfeed their babies in series of spectacular photos to show 'every milky goddess out there deserves to feel like one'

1396
Monday, 12 March, 2018, 02:15
Natural is best! Australian mothers breastfeed their babies in series of spectacular photos to show 'every milky goddess out there deserves to feel like one'

Natural is best! Australian mothers breastfeed their babies in series of spectacular photos to show 'every milky goddess out there deserves to feel like one'

Through her powerful photographs, Ms Murnane said she wants to 'erase the negative stigmas' that surround breastfeeding.

She has chosen stunning backdrops for the images such as the Barossa Valley, Seaford Valley in Victoria and Milaa Milaa Falls in Queensland.

'I want mothers everywhere to feel comfortable when nourishing their child,' she wrote on her Facebook page.

'I want to live in a world where women and men alike encourage mothers to feed their babies, whenever and wherever they see fit, without a second thought.
'I look forward to living in a world where a mother can feed her infant and passers by are able to make eye contact with her and not give a second thought to her breast being used to feed her baby.

'Where it’s normal for women to be surrounded by support of her breastfeeding choices. And every single one of us can celebrate our journey, without being shamed.

'I want women to feed their babies anywhere they are without being scared of hurtful or negative comments. I want to empower breastfeeding mothers and the next time they sit down to feed their baby where ever they may be they know that the have the support of thousands.

'Together through the power of images we will change the negative views surrounding breastfeeding.'

Ms Murnane told Daily Mail Australia that breastfeeding rates remain 'really low' and she began her project after feeling a lack of support when she had her first child.

'I think we don't have enough people that are passionate about breast feeding,' she said.

'The health professionals are often not educated enough around breast feeding women don't have enough support'.

Ms Murnane said that when she had her second child the situation had improved and she had friends that would even wet nurse her daughter.